Fedra Sans Hebrew

Design concept

Fedra Sans reflects the original design brief: it humanises the communicated message and adds simple, informal elegance. An important criterion was to create a typeface which works equally well on paper and on the computer screen. The typeface attempts to reconcile two opposing design approaches: rigidity of a typeface designed for the computer screen and flexibility of a handwriting.

fedra sans drawing2

Today Fedra Sans is one of the most popular typefaces around. In 2007 Font- Shop published the first independent typeface ranking provided by an independent jury of international experts, which included Fedra Sans in its 100 Best Typefaces of All Time, Fedra Sans was has been also included in the seminal book The Visual History of Type, a survey of the major typefaces produced since the advent of printing.

Related Styles

Fedra Sans is part of a large coordinated typeface families consisting of these styles:

fedra styles

Secondary Style

Traditionally, Hebrew printed typography doesn't have a notion of “Italic”, a concept linked with the evolution of the Latin alphabet. Hebrew, however, when written by hand used cursive forms taught at schools simultaneously from when children start to read, the informal style hasn’t integrated into printed typography. Fedra Hebrew contains a unique cursive styles that allow emphasising key points in a printed text, or when quoting a text, giving Hebrew designers the same possibilities as Western typographers have. More about the Hebrew secondary styles▸

fedra sans cursive

International Typography

Fedra Sans is Typotheque’s most extensive font. Besides the Latin, the font family supports also Armenian, Bengali, Cyrillic, Devanagari, Greek/a>, Hebrew, Inuktitut, Tamil writing scripts, supporting over 2 billion native speakers. This is one of the reasons why Fedra Sans is official typeface of the Decode Unicode project.

fedra sans 10 scripts

Authors

Fedra Sans was designed in 2001 by Peter Biľak. In 2017 the Hebrew version was released designed by Michal Sahar.