Parmigiano Headline

Design Concept

Parmigiano Typographic System (named after Parma, the city where Bodoni established his printing house) has the stated ambition to be the most extensive family of fonts ever to have been inspired by Giambattista Bodoni.

Parmigiano Headline is the group leader, the posh and self-confident cut of the family. Of all the other styles of the family it is the closest to Bodoni’s original designs and has the most contrast. It also features smaller bowls as well as delicate and subtly refined shapes. Its generous ascenders add elegance, and its narrow proportions balanced by round letterforms make it a space-saver. Parmigiano Headline is perfect for use at big type sizes without sacrificing the black and white rhythm within the line, a great choice for advertisement and magazine titles.

Headline’s frugality, delicacy and controlled width recall some of the display cuts in Bodoni’s 1818 Manuale Tipografico. Far from being a facsimile of any of Bodoni’s types, however, Headline is more of a synthesis of the key features to be seen in his bigger romans. It was specifically conceived for setting titles and headlines, and is not recommended for sizes smaller than 20 points.
Read more about development of Parmigiano▸

Parmigiano Type System

OpenType features

Like all Typotheque fonts, Parmigiano includes Small Caps in all styles. Additionally, Parmigiano includes a wealth of other advanced OpenType features. For more information please see the PDF instructions, or the Features section.

Parmigiano Small Caps

Numerals

All weights of Parmigiano include nine different kinds of numerals. Proportional Lining figures come as default figures in Parmigiano. It also, however, includes Old-style figures, Tabular numerals (both lining and OsF), Small Caps figures, superior, inferior, circled and circled inverted numerals (selectable via OpenType features), and slighly taller Lining figures that match the heigh of Capitals.

Parmigiano numerals

Author

The Parmigiano Type Family family was published in 2014, designed by Riccardo Olocco and Jonathan Pierini. The Cyrillic version was designed by Ilya Ruderman and Irina Smirnova. The Greek version was designed by Irene Vlachou, in 2015.