Parmigiano Piccolo

Design Concept

Parmigiano Typographic System (named after Parma, the city where Bodoni established his printing house) has the stated ambition to be the most extensive family of fonts ever to have been inspired by Giambattista Bodoni.

Parmigiano Piccolo may at first seem utterly foreign to Bodoni’s design principles, and its thick-set, ungraceful design would seem to belong to another family. Although it shares the same structure as the other cuts of the system, Parmigiano Piccolo is closer to the Scotch Roman models of the early 1800s, with their reduced contrast, shorter ascenders and descenders, and rather narrow proportions. And just as the Scotch Romans were the outcome of commercial considerations, Parmigiano Piccolo focuses on practicality and legibility. Although its features set it apart from the elegant refinement of the rest of the Parmigiano family, it is the one to trust in critical conditions. Thanks to its reduced contrast and strong serifs, it is the perfect choice when the texture of the paper or the quality of printing threaten your text, or when you are looking for a deliberate touch of roughness.
Read more about development of Parmigiano.

Parmigiano Type System

OpenType features

Like all Typotheque fonts, Parmigiano includes Small Caps in all styles. Additionally, Parmigiano includes a wealth of other advanced OpenType features. For more information please see the PDF instructions, or the Features section.

Parmigiano Small Caps

Numerals

All weights of Parmigiano include nine different kinds of numerals. Proportional Lining figures come as default figures in Parmigiano. It also, however, includes Old-style figures, Tabular numerals (both lining and OsF), Small Caps figures, superior, inferior, circled and circled inverted numerals (selectable via OpenType features), and slighly taller Lining figures that match the heigh of Capitals.

Parmigiano numerals

Author

The Parmigiano Type Family family was published in 2014, designed by Riccardo Olocco and Jonathan Pierini. The Cyrillic version was designed by Ilya Ruderman and Irina Smirnova. The Greek version was designed by Irene Vlachou, in 2015.