@font-face


@font-face is a CSS specification which allows websites to use remote fonts.

Typotheque font files remain in cache for one week, and CSS files are cached for 5 minutes. Practically speaking, this means that font data is loaded significantly faster, while changes in CSS can be still visible in 5 minutes.
When using Elementar in a browser, you can specify the CSS rule to ensure that the fonts are displayed without aliasing:body { -webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased; }
Typotheque offers three different ways of using fonts on the web. Hosted Webfonts is the simplest option, ready to use in minutes. Clients receive CSS code for using fonts online, and manage their project via Typotheque online account.
A few users reported on issues with anti-aliasing of webfonts. Almost always these issues were local, and impossible to reproduce on other computers. While we don't know exactly the source of the problem, the problem seems to be caused by the OS, and not the fonts.
Typotheque webfont system offers a possibility to apply Small Caps replacing the standard lower case letters with true small capitals. Sometimes people accidentally turn this feature on, which results in seeing all capital text. You can turn the Small Caps on and off at any time directly in your...
Because web browsers do not support OpenType layout features, we built a system that generates font files on the fly and can apply OpenType features directly to the file. This enables us to support true small caps as well as various styles of numerals.
In some browsers, most notably Firefox, you may see a barely noticeable ‘blink’ (a.k.a. Flash Of Unstyled Content) before the real font loads in. This is a result of Firefox’s handling of the @font-face rule.
The @font-face rule is a W3C standard allowing authors to specify online fonts for displaying text on their webpages.
The @font-face rule is supported by Firefox 3.5, Safari 3.1, Opera 10, Chrome 5 and Internet Explorer 4.0. Our system is thus compatible with more than 98% of all browsers in use. For older browsers you can define a list of default web-safe font stacks.
Up until now, if you wanted to use fonts on a website you were limited to one of the dozen or so ‘web-safe’ fonts (Verdana, Times, Helvetica—you know, the ones you see everywhere on the web).
You can use our fonts to create websites, but since visitors may not have the same fonts installed, you will need to convert the fonts to images (GIF, JPG or PNG) so that the pages display as you intend. You can also use the fonts in Flash websites.