font formats


Font format refers to the type of font file, e.g. OpenType .otf, TrueType .ttf, Postscript .pfm.

Articles 3

Designer and programmer Jürg Lehni analyses the evolution of typographic technology and the nature of digital fonts, and introduces Donald E. Knuth’s groundbreaking TeX and Metafont systems. An essay complemented by interviews with Peter Biľak, Erik Spiekermann and Dimitri Bruni (NORM).
Essays · 14 April 2011 · English · 4373 words
Jürg Lehni and Peter Biľak in a conversation about the role of technology in type design, font formats and production tools, and Donald E. Knuth’s Metafont.
Interviews · 14 April 2011 · English · 1544 words
A glossary of tools and technologies mentioned in Typeface As Programme.
Essays · 14 April 2011 · English · 1084 words

Blogs 2

We constantly monitor the performance of our webfont service and work on ways make it faster and more efficient. Today we are announcing technical changes that you can take advantage of to get significantly improved webfont serving.
19 September 2012
Typotheque’s webfont service now supports the iPhone and iPad, as well as Android mobile devices (and, of course, all the desktop browsers that we’ve supported from the beginning).
9 November 2010

Help 14

Typotheque fonts are Unicode compliant, so you need to enter your text correctly encoded. An easy way to find out if you have correctly encoded text is to copy-paste a sample of the text into Internet browser, for example into Google search.
PostScript or Type 1 fonts were developed by Adobe in 1985 for use with their PostScript printers. Initially, this font technology was available only from Adobe.
Briefly, OpenType is a font format jointly developed by Adobe and Microsoft in the late 1990ʼs. It came into wider use only after 2000, when Adobe included support for advanced typographic features in their InDesign, PhotoShop, and Illustrator applications.
We offer fonts primarily in OpenType format. OpenType is the only cross-platform format, i.e. the same file will work on both Macintosh and Windows computers.
While all OpenType fonts will work in nearly all existing software, only some applications take full advantage of OpenTypeʼs advanced layout features. Applications such as InDesign, Illustrator, PhotoShop, QuarkXPress 7 (and higher), Word 2010 and Mellel offer these options.