hinting


Font hinting is the process of adapting an outline font to a rasterised grid, critical for producing clear legible text for on-screen text display.

Articles 2

Designer and programmer Jürg Lehni analyses the evolution of typographic technology and the nature of digital fonts, and introduces Donald E. Knuth’s groundbreaking TeX and Metafont systems. An essay complemented by interviews with Peter Biľak, Erik Spiekermann and Dimitri Bruni (NORM).
Essays · 14 April 2011 · English · 4373 words
Hinting, or screen optimising, is the process by which TrueType or PostScript fonts are adjusted for maximum readability on computer monitors. This text compares different ways of hinting (black & white, grey-scale, ClearType, DirectWrite), and explains the behaviour of fonts under different rasterisers.
Tutorials · 17 May 2010 · English · 1920 words

Blogs 3

To help foundries, designers and end users, we are proposing standardised icons to identify the hinting methods used for each font.
3 September 2012
Irma Screen is designed to work equally well on paper and the computer screen. It is available in TrueType format only and has been specially optimised for exceptional readability on laptops, desktops, mobile devices and other digital displays.
3 September 2012
After launching our own webfont system, Typotheque now offers fonts specially engineered and optimised for exceptional readability on the computer monitor. These fonts use TrueType outlines, and were manually hinted to achieve crystal-clear results on computer screens.
20 June 2010

Authors 1

Studied at the Technical University Košice to become an Electrotechnical engineer. After years working for a mobile phone company, he left to h...

Help 3

Quality of font rendering varies greatly depending on platform and application. Mac OSX uses a generic rendering algorithm which displays all fonts equally well and completely ignores font hinting. Windows on the other hand only displays well TrueType fonts which have been optimized (hinted) for the screen.
The TrueType format was jointly developed by Apple and Microsoft in 1991, several years after the release of the PostScript Type 1 font format. Despite the format’s technical superiority (most of the system fonts on both Mac and Windows computers are TrueType) it never became popular amongst designers.
PostScript or Type 1 fonts were developed by Adobe in 1985 for use with their PostScript printers. Initially, this font technology was available only from Adobe.

Other pages 1

Typotheque offers a range of consultation services covering typographic conventions for various languages, optical adjustments of text, orthography and legibility issues.