Peter Biľak


Peter Biľak (1973–) is a Slovakian graphic designer and type designer based in The Netherlands, founder of Typotheque and Dot Dot Dot magazine, designer of Fedra, Greta and Eureka typefaces.

Independent art/design publication which began life as a graphic design magazine, but whose content has gradually widened to cover art, music, language, film and literature.
A limited edition full set of Works That Work magazine, in a specially made slipcase.
Final issue of Works That Work magazine. This issue presents a vision of design that we believe in, design as a process that leads to permanent betterment of life and where everyone involved benefits.
Typotheque Type specimen No.15 presents 21 Hebrew type families, and describes the process of designing them.
The Sport and Game issue of WTW, about sport as a powerful tool for shaping the foundations of a community, for solving problems where politicians stalemate and for paving the way for social progress.
This bilingual English/German type specimen presents Typotheque type families which are available in Sans/Serif or Sans/Slab variations.
Backstage Talks is an in-depth interview magazine about how design can change business for better by making it both useful and beautiful.
This issue of Works That Work magazine is exploring the role of design in the development of Bhutan.
A dense book full of investigation of the typographic practice, elaborating on the future and new developments in the field of typography.
This issue of WTW strives to probe beyond the visible aspect of design. We look at the invisible organisational principles shaping our lives.
This issue of Works That Work is exploring the fine line between breaking the rules and breaking the laws.
If necessity is the mother of invention, extreme environments must be hotbeds of innovation. This issue of Works That Work finds out.
This type specimen features in detail Greta Sans type family and includes the extensive article on the process of designing type systems.
The complete Typotheque collection, information about OpenType and its typographic features, in a hard cover limited edition.
Typeface as Program documents results of workshops at the ECAL school. The books presents some basic idea of automated type design, breaking down the design of letters to series of parameters.
A publication which began life as a graphic design magazine, but whose content has gradually widened to cover art, music, language, politics, film and literature.
Art/design publication which began life as a graphic design magazine, but whose content has widened to cover art, music, language, politics, film and literature.
This practical cloth-bound sketchbook comes with 216 pages of fine quality paper separated with colour inserted pages after each section.
Art/design publication which began life as a graphic design magazine, but whose content has widened to cover art, music, language, politics, film and literature.
Bi-annual independent art/design publication which began life as a graphic design magazine, but whose content has gradually widened to cover art, music, language, film and literature.
DDDX is a montage of articles drawn from issues 2–9. This is not a retrospective act, more a logical next step; a slight return in response to the self-righteous statment of intent on the cover of issue 1; a reply to ourselves after five years’ trial & error.
This magazine began life as a graphic design journal, but whose content has gradually widened to cover other areas.
Art/design publication which began life as a graphic design magazine, but whose content has widened to cover art, music, language, film and literature.
Art/design publication which began life as a graphic design magazine, but whose content has widened to cover art, music, language, film and literature.
Independent art/design publication which began life as a graphic design magazine, but whose content has gradually widened to cover art, music, language, film and literature.
This publication presents work of Czech and Slovak designers focused on the process of creating innovative typographic solutions
Metro Letters documents the responses to the question ‘Can a typeface express what is unique about a city’, presenting the projects and interviews with six invited typographers highlighting their working process and conceptual proposals. Includes essays by Gail Swanlund and Michael Worthington.