webfonts


Webfonts are fonts embedded in websites and hosted on remote servers.

Typotheque Webfont Service supports all characters that our fonts support. Look up the particular font that you are interested in, and see all Glyphs that it support. For example, Fedra Sans Book supports over 2500 glyphs.
Typotheque font files remain in cache for one week, and CSS files are cached for 5 minutes. Practically speaking, this means that font data is loaded significantly faster, while changes in CSS can be still visible in 5 minutes.
Typotheque offers three different ways of using fonts on the web. Typotheque Webfont service is the simplest option, ready to use in minutes. Clients receive CSS code for using fonts online, and manage their project via Typotheque online account.
Yes, you can change the billing details at any time. Log in to your Account, and go to My Webfonts. Click on the tab Users, and enter the email address of the new user. The new user must have a Typotheque account with this email address.
Typotheque webfont system offers a possibility to apply Small Caps replacing the standard lower case letters with true small capitals. Sometimes people accidentally turn this feature on, which results in seeing all capital text. You can turn the Small Caps on and off at any time directly in your...
Quality of font rendering varies greatly depending on platform and application. Mac OSX uses a generic rendering algorithm which displays all fonts equally well and completely ignores font hinting. Windows on the other hand only displays well TrueType fonts which have been optimized (hinted) for the screen.
When reaching the limit of free 500MB per month, you will receive an invoice at the end of the month for the bandwidth that go over the free limit. There is currently no way to pre-pay the bandwidth, you receive an invoice after exceeding the limit.
If you'd like to cancel the monthly webfonts subscription, simply log in to your account, go to My Webfonts, and either Disable, or Delete the active project. Alternatively, you can keep it Active, setting the Monthly Budget to 0 Euro (in Stats).
To make the webfont files as small as possible, we remove some inaccessible glyphs, and users can specify languages to support. Licensed fonts can use as many as 5 languages, trial licences work with a single language. You can also specify custom sets, and preview the glyph set directly.
The grades of Greta Text and Greta Text Narrow were designed for print environment and are not available for online use. Those are very subtle details in weight, and in our tests they proved impossible to distinguish.
We now offer two different font licences. The Print & Web Licence (formerly the Basic Licence) entitles you to download the font files to your computer and use them in print applications as well as on the web.
Since the version of Apple iOS 4.2, Mobile Safari in the iPhone and iPad support real fonts in TrueType and OpenType format. The previous version of iOS had to use SVG fonts when using @font-face feature.
Sure. Below are links to pages that we made.
Yes you can. Our CSS is designed to recognise local fonts, and if the given font is installed locally it is used first. In that case the webfonts are not used, so no bandwidth is consumed.
Yes, you can. To set a monthly bandwidth budget, log in to your account, go to Webfonts, and click on Stats. After the monthly limit is reached, the next font specified in the font stack will be used until the end of the month.
Yes, it is possible. Please contact us directly when you are ready to do so. Both users will have to have a Typotheque account and agree to the terms of the licence.
We created an API so that other font vendors can also sell webfont licenses using our system. More information will be available via: www.type-applications.com. Please get in touch to discuss the possibilities.
For technical reasons, PostScript fonts can’t be used to create web-embeddable fonts, so if you licensed PostScript versions of our fonts, you will first need to upgrade to OpenType versions.
The Print & Web Licence of our OpenType fonts permits you to download the font files and use them in your favourite print applications. When you want to use them on a website, log in to your account to generate a block of CSS code for your webpage.
Typotheque webfonts support all languages supported by their print versions. That’s over 200 languages, including those using Cyrillic, Greek and Arabic scripts.
Instead of providing a font file directly to clients, we provide a block of dynamically-generated CSS code for use on the client’s site. The actual font file is hosted on our secure servers, and its URL is not visible to the end user.
Our Web Font Service Licence doesn’t cover placing the font files on your own server. Use Typotheque’s font-embedding method instead. It automatically generates a block of CSS code that you can use on your site.
We wrote a simple tutorial on how to implement the CSS code generated by the Web Font Service.
Up until now, if you wanted to use fonts on a website you were limited to one of the dozen or so ‘web-safe’ fonts (Verdana, Times, Helvetica—you know, the ones you see everywhere on the web).
You can use our fonts to create websites, but since visitors may not have the same fonts installed, you will need to convert the fonts to images (GIF, JPG or PNG) so that the pages display as you intend. You can also use the fonts in Flash websites.