Typonine Sans

About

Typonine Sans is the quintessential low-contrast humanist sans serif. Refined, balanced, warm and personal, Typonine Sans provides a functional solution for all-purpose typography. Clear and legible, with a reasonably large x-height, it is suited to both print and screen typography.

Available in
More
Rent
LightBuy
Amsterdam
Light ItalicBuy
Bengaluru
RegularBuy
Copenhagen
Regular ItalicBuy
Damascus
MediumBuy
Edinburgh
Medium ItalicBuy
Fortaleza
BoldBuy
Guangzhou
Bold ItalicBuy
Hong Kong
BoldBuy
In its most general sense, the term ‘world' refers to the totality of entities, to the whole of reality or to everything that is. The nature of the world has been conceptualized differently in different fields. Some conceptions see the world as unique while others talk of a 'plurality of worlds'. Some treat the world as one simple object while others analyze the world as a complex made up of many parts. In scientific cosmology the world or universe is commonly defined as 'the totality of all space and time; all that is, has been, and will be'. Theories of modality, on the other hand, talk of possible worlds as complete and consistent ways how things could have been. Phenomenology, starting from the horizon of co-given objects present in the periphery of every experience, defines the world as the biggest horizon or the 'horizon of all horizons'. In philosophy of mind, the world is commonly contrasted with the mind as that which is represented by the mind. Theology conceptualizes the world in relation to God, for example, as God’s creation, as identical to God or as the two being interdependent. In religions, there is often a tendency to downgrade the material or sensory world in favor of a spiritual world to be sought through religious practice. A comprehensive representation of the world and our place in it, as is commonly found in religions, is known as a worldview. Cosmogony is the field that studies the origin or creation of the world while eschatology refers to the science or doctrine of the last things or of the end of the world.
RegularBuy
In its most general sense, the term ‘world' refers to the totality of entities, to the whole of reality or to everything that is. The nature of the world has been conceptualized differently in different fields. Some conceptions see the world as unique while others talk of a 'plurality of worlds'. Some treat the world as one simple object while others analyze the world as a complex made up of many parts. In scientific cosmology the world or universe is commonly defined as 'the totality of all space and time; all that is, has been, and will be'. Theories of modality, on the other hand, talk of possible worlds as complete and consistent ways how things could have been. Phenomenology, starting from the horizon of co-given objects present in the periphery of every experience, defines the world as the biggest horizon or the 'horizon of all horizons'. In philosophy of mind, the world is commonly contrasted with the mind as that which is represented by the mind. Theology conceptualizes the world in relation to God, for example, as God’s creation, as identical to God or as the two being interdependent. In religions, there is often a tendency to downgrade the material or sensory world in favor of a spiritual world to be sought through religious practice. A comprehensive representation of the world and our place in it, as is commonly found in religions, is known as a worldview. Cosmogony is the field that studies the origin or creation of the world while eschatology refers to the science or doctrine of the last things or of the end of the world.
Typonine Sans In Use

Design Concept

Typonine Sans is the quintessential low-contrast humanist sans serif. Refined, balanced, warm and personal, Typonine Sans provides a functional solution for all-purpose typography. It is clear and legible, with open counters for optimal legibility, and a reasonably large x-height suited to both print and screen typography. The italic is gently sloping, with cursive details that emphasise the humanist roots of the typeface.

Typonine Sans, Design Concept

Typonine Font Family

The Typonine type collection consists of a Sans and a Condensed version, intended for all-purpose typography, a Hairline version for extremely large headlines, a Monospaced version for correspondence and computer code, and finally also a Stencil version for elegant headlines. Combine it with Thema, a serif typeface structurally related to the rest of the Typonine family.

Typonine Font Family

Numeral styles

Each weight of Typonine Sans includes eight different kinds of numerals. Proportional lining figures come as default figures in Typonine Sans. It also, however, includes old-style figures, tabular numerals (both lining and old-style), superior, inferior, circled and circled inverted numerals. For running text, old-style figures work best; for use in capital setting, use lining figures. When you take a licence for this font, you can choose your own default numeral variant.

Typonine Sans typeface, numeral styles

  • Released2008

Cyrillic

  • Rusyn
  • Kazakh
  • Russian
  • Abaza
  • Buryat
  • Dargin
  • Kabardian
  • Komi
  • Bulgarian
  • Chechen
  • Kirghyz
  • Macedonian
  • Ossetic
  • Serbian
  • Tajik (Cyrillic)
  • Ukrainian
  • Belarusian
  • Yakut
  • Abkhaz
  • Dolgan
  • Kalmyk
  • Adyghe
  • Avar
  • Dungan
  • Balkar
  • Karakalpak
  • Mordvin (Moksha)
  • Nivkh
  • Enets
  • Ingush
  • Itelmen
  • Kumyk
  • Azeri (Cyrillic)
  • Bashkir
  • Selkup
  • Nanai
  • Nenets
  • Lak
  • Lezgian
  • Mordvin (Erzya)
  • Tabasaran
  • Altai
  • Chukcha
  • Chuvash
  • Yupik
  • Even
  • Khanty
  • Koryak
  • Manci
  • Nogai
  • Tuva
  • Tatar
  • Uighur
  • Rutul
  • Tuvan
  • Moldovan
  • Mari
  • Aghul
  • Evenki
  • Khakas
  • Mansi
  • Nganasan
  • Tsakhur
  • Udmurt
  • Kildin Sami

Latin

  • English
  • Comorian
  • Luba-Kasai
  • Marquesan
  • Danish
  • Dutch
  • Italian
  • Haitian
  • Estonian
  • German
  • Friulian
  • Galician
  • French
  • Finnish
  • Fijian
  • Frisian
  • Luxemburgish
  • Spanish
  • Swahili
  • Breton
  • Bislama
  • Basque
  • Afar
  • Afrikaans
  • Zulu
  • Tetum
  • Portuguese
  • Norwegian
  • Swedish
  • Catalan
  • Polish
  • Slovak
  • Czech
  • Maltese
  • Albanian
  • Indonesian
  • Irish Gaelic
  • Latvian
  • Lithuanian
  • Slovene
  • Rhaeto-Romanic
  • Hungarian
  • Sorbian
  • Kurdish
  • Hawaiian
  • Esperanto
  • Welsh
  • Sámi (Northern)
  • Faroese
  • Greenlandic
  • Icelandic
  • Croatian
  • Romanian
  • Romani
  • Turkish
  • Bosnian
  • Phonetics
  • Sámi (Inari)
  • Sámi (Lule)
  • Sámi (Southern)
  • Vietnamese
  • Azeri (Latin)
  • Interlingua
  • Sanskrit transliteration
  • Malay
  • Māori
  • Turkmen
  • Uzbek
  • Tagalog (Filipino)
  • Malagasy
  • Crimean Tatar
  • Guaraní
  • Kashubian
  • Xhosa
  • Silesian
  • Cornish
  • Manx
  • Oromo
  • Somali (Latin)
  • Aymara
  • Ganda
  • Ido
  • Javanese
  • Gikuyu
  • Kinyarwanda
  • Kirundi
  • Kongo
  • Kwanyama
  • Nauruan
  • Navajo
  • Ndebele (Northern)
  • Ndebele (Southern)
  • Quechua
  • Samoan
  • Shona
  • Sotho
  • Sundanese
  • Tahitian
  • Tongan
  • Tsonga
  • Tswana
  • Twi
  • Wolof
  • Yoruba
  • Cheyenne
  • Chichewa
  • Kiribati
  • Swati
  • Pinyin
  • Arabic transliteration
  • Ladin
  • Igbo
  • Karelian
  • Veps
  • Chamorro
  • Marshallese
  • Montenegrin
  • Náhuatl
  • Norfuk
  • Occitan
  • Papiamento
  • Pedi
  • Sardinian
  • Seychelles Creole
  • Tok Pisin
  • Tuvalu
  • Aromanian
  • Ga
  • Gagauz
  • Ulithian
  • Venda
  • Chokwe
  • Chuukese
  • Kituba
  • Lingala
  • Maninka
  • Nyanja
  • Otomi
  • Palauan
  • Rarotongan
  • Sango
  • Temne
  • Umbundu
  • Bemba
  • Gwich’in
  • Scottish Gaelic
  • Tokelauan
  • Aranese
  • Cofán
  • Pictograms
  • Norn
  • Romaji
  • Old Norse
  • Chiquitano
  • Araona
  • Cavineña
  • Ayoreo

  • g
    g

    Single storey `g`

    ss02

    Alternative version of the lower case letter ‘g’, including its accented variants.
  • Ha
    Ha

    Small Caps

    smcp

    Most Typotheque fonts implement the Small Caps feature. In Adobe applications you can replace lower case letters with small caps using the keyboard shortcut (⌘ + ⇧ + H), or the OpenType menu.
  • Ha
    Ha

    All Small Capitals

    smcp, c2sc

    There are two methods of applying small capitals. The first one replaces only lower case letters with small caps. The second method, All Small Caps, also replaces capital letters with small caps. It also replaces regular quotation marks, exclamation points, question marks, slashes and usually also numerals with small caps variants.
  • (H:
    (H:

    Case Sensitive Forms

    case

    When the ‘change to caps’ function is applied from within an application (not when text is typed in caps) appropriate case-sensitive forms are automatically applied. Regular brackets, parenthesis, dashes and hyphens are replaced with their capital forms.
  • (1)
    (1)

    Circled numerals and arrows

    dlig

    The discretionary ligature feature creates real arrows when you type the combination -> (right arrow), <- (left arrow), -^ (up arrow) or ^- (down arrow). It also creates enclosed numerals when you type numerals inside parenthesis, and inverse enclosed numerals when you type numerals inside brackets. Discretionary ligatures are off by default in Adobe applications.
  • fi
    fi

    Standard Ligatures

    liga

    Standard ligatures are those which are designed to improve the readability of certain letter pairs. For example, when this feature is activated, typing ‘f’ and ‘i’ will automatically produce the ‘fi’ ligature. Using ligatures does not affect the spelling and hyphenation of your text in any way.
  • 19
    19

    Proportional Old-style Figures

    onum, pnum

    Typotheque fonts contain various styles of numerals within one font. Proportional Lining Figures come standard in all our headline and newspaper fonts. Their proportions are specifically designed to work well with capital letters (for example, in headlines). The proportional Old-style Figures feature changes standard figures to Old-style Figures which work well in running text, as they have the same proportions as lower case letters with their ascenders and descenders.
  • 19
    19

    Tabular Lining Figures

    lnum, tnum

    Tabular figures are for use in tables where numerals need to be aligned vertically. Tabular figures are available as a OpenType feature and have a fixed width in all weights. Typotheque fonts include both Lining and Old-style Tabular figures.
  • 19
    19

    Tabular Old-style Figures

    onum, tnum

    Tabular figures are for use in tables where numerals need to be aligned vertically. Tabular figures are available as a OpenType feature and have a fixed width in all weights. Typotheque fonts include both Lining and Old-style Tabular figures.
  • 2/9
    2/9

    Arbitrary Fractions

    frac

    Typotheque OpenType fonts already include a number of pre-designed diagonal fractions. The fraction feature allows you to create other fractions quickly and easily.
  • H1
    H1

    Superiors

    sups

    Replaces all styles of figures (old style, tabular, lining) and letters with their superior alternates, which can be used for footnotes, formulas, etc. Superior characters are more legible than mathematically scaled characters, have a similar stroke weight, are spaced more generously, and better complement the rest of the text.
  • H1
    H1

    Inferiors

    sinf

    Replaces all styles of figures (old style, tabular, lining) and letters with their inferior alternates, used primarily for mathematical or chemical notation. Inferior characters are more legible than mathematically scaled characters, have a similar stroke weight, are spaced more generously, and better complement the rest of the text
  • ж
    ж

    Bulgarian Cyrillic

    Bulgarian readers prefer to set text in a variation of Cyrillic that differs from the standard Cyrillic by using shapes of letters based on cursive handwriting, where letters are easier to tell apart. Typotheque fonts use standard Cyrillic forms as default, and Bulgarian Cyrillic is applied when the text is tagged as Bulgarian. When the Localised forms feature is not available, you can also apply the same forms by using a Stylistic Set.
  • п
    п

    Serbian & Macedonian Cyrillic

    Serbian and Macedonian Cyrillic has different preferred shapes for some italic letters, which differ from the standard Cyrillic. Typotheque fonts use standard Cyrillic forms as default, and Serbian Cyrillic italic is applied when the text is tagged as Serbian Or Macedonian. When the Localised forms feature is not available, you can also apply the same forms by using a Stylistic Set.